This may come as a shock to some, but Mondays make up one-seventh of your life. I don’t know when we took the societal poll to unanimously hate Mondays and elect it to be the day of the week to be unhappy, but poor Monday! Mondays make up 14% of all the time you have. And if you are like me, you often let Monday blues creep into your Sunday evenings, so Monday is actually taking up even more of your week. At this rate, a B- is the best grade you can get on your weekly happiness report card.

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Monday gets treated like a bad ex-boyfriend you run into all the time. (“Ugh, you again.”) And there are endless memes and letterboard quotes to prove it. And I really bought into this anti-Monday lie—that all Mondays are predestined to have less to look forward to and are harder to deal with. Then my cousin mentioned the talk The Time is Now by Marvin J. Ashton in his mission letter home 3 weeks ago. (Guys, this talk has literally change my life on how I view Mondays and how I spend my time! Do yourself a favor, and read it.) Elder Ashton says, “The pleasant future belongs to those who properly use today [Mondays]. We need to find the abundant life as we go along”—regardless if it is Monday or the weekend. President Monson said it a little different: “You do not find the happy life—you make it.” And our happiness potential is greatly diminished if we let the day of the week affect that. You have to be a happy hustler 7 days a week if genuine happiness is your goal.

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Elder Ashton asks, “How can we be happy tomorrow if our “nows” [ or Mondays] are filled with self-inflicted unhappiness and unwise delays? Generally speaking, those inclined to count their daily blessings have more to count because they help make more possible as they learn gratitude.”  If we take Elder Ashton’s advice, we will let Carpe Diem be are goal, and regardless of Monday or not, we will live more presently and more happily in the now, every Monday, and every other day of the week.

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